[Tig] why vectorscopes aren't that useful for color matching

Tim Stipan stipantim
Sat May 20 05:46:40 BST 2006


--
Thanks to oktobor for supporting the TIG
--
i use the Gain on the vectorscope to help determine
where my levels are at, ie. so i now i have pure
whites and blacks. i consistently look at my
vectorscope during di/commercial work to insure i have
consistent blacks. Line mode can also be a beneficial
tool. i x-ferd a hair and makeup/camera filtration
test today and i watched my blacks for every take to
see how they responded to the different filters
exposure adjustments. You have to be able to read a
vector and wave form to  know how to put out a clean
pic, your eye is easily biased to personal taste/
lighting environment, thats simply color 101! it is
both an engineering use and a creative use. The main
difference is that a (not all) engineers would balance
out a perfect grade card and a colorist would do them
same but then add contrast and push the whites to the
desired look for the film. Like Marc said the monitor
tells the true story!

Happy vector monitoring!


P.S. Can you dual sync scope manufactures please
implement the gain function? YOU kNOW WHO YOU ARE!!!

TS TCS NYC

 NOTE:  The comments above are strictly mine, and DO
 not necessarily represent those of my employers.
 

--- Marc Wielage <mfw at musictrax.com> wrote:

> --
> Thanks to oktobor for supporting the TIG
> --
> On 5/17/06 5:25 PM, "glenn chan"
> <glennchan at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > To go against the conventional thinking here...
> I've heard some people say
> > that colorists need to watch their scopes (i.e. in
> books, in conversations
> > with people).  However, I find that vectorscopes
> are more useful for
> > engineering uses than creative uses.
>
>------------------------------<snip>------------------------------<
> 
> I don't agree.  I think Vectorscopes have several
> uses.  To say they're more
> valuable for one thing over another does them a
> disservice.  (And I agree
> completely with what Craig says elsewhere, which
> also goes with my
> experience.)
> 
> The number one thing I think most colorists use the
> Vector display for is
> just to see the relative black balance and white
> balance.  I find it much
> faster to do this rather than look at the RGB
> waveform parade display.  And
> often, in our work, speed is of the essence.
> 
> We can and do sometimes use vectorscopes to match
> two different shots so
> that their overall black and white balance are the
> same (or at least in the
> ballpark).  So to that end, the vector display can
> be very useful.
> 
> At the same time, as I often tell DPs, the monitor
> really tells 90% of the
> story, and ultimately, it's more important than the
> scopes.  If the picture
> looks bad on the monitor but good on the scopes,
> then the picture is still
> bad.  I believe in terms of color, the end justifies
> the means.
> 
> --Marc Wielage/Senior Colorist
> Technicolor Creative Services
> Hollywood, USA
> 
> NOTE:  The comments above are strictly mine, and may
> not necessarily
> represent those of my employers.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
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> TIG wiki: http://tig.colorist.org/wiki
> 


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