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Re: Old technologies.




Without getting into vinyl specific issues such as dust, finger prints, and 
disk mastering dynamic range / playing time tradeoffs, I would suggest that 
the sound quality of state of the art, high quality analog audio technology 
compares extremely favorably to state of the art, high quality 16 bit, 44.1 
Hz sample rate (CD standard) digital audio technology.  I would even say 
that if one were to compare a high quality analog scoring original master to 
a high quality (CD standard) digital scoring original master (recorded in 
parallel), the analog master would beat the digital master for sonic quality 
without question.  But, if you don't listen too hard, the difference would 
be minimal.

This is a comment based on my own personal experience, and listening to 
controlled comparisons.  I consider it a real treat to hear such analog 
masters at work from time to time because I don't work in a scoring stage 
often, and of course, I can't afford to have that level of quality analog 
equipment in my home.  Even if I did, I doubt the copyright holders would 
let me take their masters home for me to enjoy in my living room.  So, I 
listen to my CDs at home and enjoy them because they sound almost as good as 
the original analog master that they might have come from, and I can buy 
them in the store too.

Sometimes, I put one of my old vinyl records on my turntable (yes, it still 
works) and listen to some of the delicate subtleties in the sound that CDs 
are unable to reproduce.  I also hear surface noise, dust from my vinyl 
disks, and distortion from the dynamic range compressors that were on the 
record lathe when the record was cut.  And I have some "direct to disk" 
records that are truly awesome to hear.

Well, I guess I should make a point somewhere in this document.  So, my 
point is, that you can't judge what the best technology is, unless you first 
determine what your quality criteria is (eg. is it more important to have a 
better signal to noise ratio than dynamic range), how that technology works 
within the established infrastructure (eg. is it reliable and / or do your 
clients accept its output format) , and what is economically viable (can you 
make any money with it).  This is true if your making images, sounds, or 
left handed hammers.  To me, doesn't matter if it's old or new technology. 
 What is important is the appropriate application of appropriate technology 
to a given task.  One thing I am sure of is, that most new technology will 
become better and cheaper as time goes on.  But every day, as an engineer, I 
have to make the decision when is the right time to use this (what ever it 
is) new technology, and then I check with the operators, salesmen, bean 
counters, and then my boss for a reality check.

Paul Wood
The preceding is my personal opinion,
I would also like to point out that I receive no money or favors from left 
handed hammer manufacturers.

 ----------
From: telecine-request
To: telecine
Cc: rob
Subject: Re: Old technologies.
Date: Tuesday, February 24, 1998 6:55PM

In a message dated 24/02/98  8:31:36, you write:

> ahem.  I not only think they sound better, I know they sound better.
>  :]  But DVD with a higher sampling rate than CD's shows promise.
>

Dear Rob,

I am shocked. However good vinyl sounds to people (some people) there really
is no rational basis for saying that you know they sound better. The music 
is
what counts either way, but vinyl puts a hell of a lot more crap between the
listener and the music. Have you ever seen what results when you measure 
vinyl
playback by digital standards? It is absolutely frightening. Perhaps most
relavant of all is the predominance of digital racording eqpt. Surely no one
would seriously advance the idea that a vinyl issue from a digital master
could outpoint a digital version. I love records too, but come on...

Adrian Thomas
London, UK

 ---
Thanks to Ross Video for support in 1998.
No product marketing allowed on the main TIG.  Contact rob at alegria.com
924 subscribers in 36 countries on Tue Feb 24 15:57:48 PST 1998
complete information on the TIG website http://www.alegria.com/tig3/


---
Thanks to Ross Video for support in 1998.
No product marketing allowed on the main TIG.  Contact rob at alegria.com
924 subscribers in 36 countries on Tue Feb 24 18:51:15 PST 1998 
complete information on the TIG website http://www.alegria.com/tig3/