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EBU vs. SMPTE Phosphor



Michael raises an interesting point about the color space differences between
EBU phosphor and SMPTE phosphor monitors.  A properly setup 
625/PAL, grade "A" monitor with EBU phosphor will make a program color
corrected on a properly setup 525/NTSC, grade "A" monitor with SMPTE
phosphor, look "warm" or slightly red.  In addition, the EBU specification for 
screen brightness calls for a maximum peak white illumination on 625/PAL 
monitors of 25 ftl.  The SMPTE specification for 525/NTSC monitors is 30ftl.  
The result here being that the detail in shadows and other low light portions of the 
program, while visible on a SMPTE setup monitor, will not visible on a properly 
setup PAL monitor.

The fax arrives from Europe, "The program looks dark and red and we're rejecting it".  
Maybe you've heard this before.  When you and the client look at the PAL film to 
tape master in your facility it looks fine.  Perhaps the difference is in the monitors.

My questions to those facilities in NTSC countries which provide film to PAL transfers. 
Do you perform color correction on a EBU phosphor monitor with the brightness set 
to 25 ftl?  If multiple transfers are required of a title, some to NTSC and some to PAL, 
and the program was color corrected on a SMPTE phosphor monitor, set to SMPTE 
brightness spec, do you compensate in any way when creating the PAL masters?

I would also be interesting to hear from those facilities in PAL countries which provide 
film to NTSC transfers.  Do you compensate for the fact that the monitors on which
your transfer is to be viewed are set up differently?
 

Jeff Dewolde
International Image
Santa Monica

"Actually Michael, I'm Christian"

-----Original Message-----
From:	Mike [SMTP:100745.1141 at CompuServe.COM]
Sent:	Thursday, August 21, 1997 1:24 AM
To:	INTERNET:telecine at sun.alegria.com
Subject:	TK Transfer v Compensated Conversion


As Jew Dewolde mentioned standards converters are designed for video, not film.
But film originated can be run through a good standards converter and at times
produce acceptable results. You would find great variance between converter
brands, my guess is using Alchemist PhC the results will be relatively better.
This does not take into account the need for correcting colour space differences
between the two line formats, as they imply thay will be viewed by monitors with
different phosphors. 
 

Mike Reichel
mikael.reichel at culinaire.se

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